Healthy Kids Mean Thriving Schools

According to the Human Development Index, Pakistan ranks among the bottom 15 countries in literacy. The literacy rate among women in Pakistan is only 36 percent, with an overall rate of 50 percent. About 25 percent of the children are not enrolled in primary schools, and 50 percent of those enrolled drop out before completing primary school. Many factors contribute to this reality, including the lack of health care. Students without access to health care are much more susceptible to dropping out.  Their lack of education leaves them with little hope for the future, and isolates them from society.

Barakat is not only aware of the importance of health care in reducing dropout rates, but has also taken practical steps to provide health care to its students. It is also necessary because quality education goes hand in hand with the quality of health of the students. To address the health issues, Barakat has started checkup programs in its three schools in Pakistan.

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Upcoming Events at Barakat, Keep Checking Up!

Mariam Rabiq, Barakat’s Outreach Director, will be speaking at various events this spring. As part of a larger lecture series entitled, “A Close Up View of Different Cultures Meeting Common Needs: the Inuit and the People of Tibet, Pakistan and Afghanistan,” Mariam will talk about the current social and political situation in Afghanistan and place it in a larger historical context.

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Friends Raise $1,400 for Barakat’s Programs

"We are glad we could raise a substantial amount that will have tangible benefits."  Usha Kandala and Palaka Bhattacharya, along with their four other classmates, tackled the daunting task of fundraising as a class assignment, but the impact of their work travels far beyond the confines of their classroom at Harvard Extension School.  Raising more than $1,400 in about six weeks, the group has ensured that 25 more women will

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BLISS Project Takes Off in Pakistan

While Barakat’s Evening School for Girls continues to gain interest from refugee girls in Pakistan, families there are still faced with the difficult choice of either sending their daughters to school or sending them to weave carpets for a meager, but helpful, wage.  Barakat’s teachers have had hundreds of conversations with parents about the value of educating their daughters, and while the Evening School educates more than 75 girls every year, economic roadblocks often cloud the benefits of an education.

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